Thanks for a great read. The holy grail of marketing is the ability to link advertising directly to consumer purchases. Increasingly, geo-targeted campaigns are making this dream a reality. Geotargeting doesn’t have to mean getting down to the local level. Larger companies can use geotargeting on a regional basis to locate specific audiences for their marketing campaigns. Facebook, Snapchat, Instagram, etc., are all offering these services.
Be sure to re-evaluate these keywords every few months -- once a quarter is a good benchmark, but some businesses like to do it even more often than that. As you gain even more authority in the SERPs, you'll find that you can add more and more keywords to your lists to tackle as you work on maintaining your current presence, and then growing in new areas on top of that.
Geo-targeted campaigns offer a number of benefits to advertisers. The first, obvious though it may sound, is that by enabling brands to reach a location-specific audience in a particular region or city, target audiences are selected with greater precision, and wasted impressions are reduced. By focusing the campaign on the parts of a population for whom it’s most relevant, an advertiser can increase the propensity of consumers to click on their ad, ultimately driving up return on investment.
It’s actually ideal to use just one keyword per ad group. This is known as a single keyword ad group (SKAG). Try using this strategy, even for large accounts, with 80 percent of keywords that get or you expect to get the most traffic. You should most definitely employ this strategy for keywords that are getting the dreaded “Rarely shown due to low quality score” warning.
Choosing landing pages for your keywords is an important element of your keyword strategy, and can be critical for both your SEO and your user experience. Look at it this way: When you click through to a site that really isn’t relevant to your search, what do you do? You most likely leave that page after a few seconds and likely won’t consider it in the future. So having poorly optimized landing pages can cost you sales. But they’ll also damage your SEO efforts, making it hard to rank.
It sounds like if your listing is not in the buy box that you are not a private label seller? Or not the only seller making sales from your product listing? If you are selling wholesale as a reseller, and sharing a product listing with other sellers, then there is no effective way to market your product using PPC. Even if you used other ad platforms, you would risk sending sales to other sellers.

The second is mobile couponing, which is being driven forward by players like Groupon, LivingSocial and Amazon. By clicking on a mobile banner, consumers can redeem coupons in-store at point of sale. Advertisers can target their campaigns to appear on the devices of any consumer browsing a mobile site or app within a given distance of one of their outlets.


Im Falle des fiktiven Supermarkts könnte es interessant sein, warum Verbraucher sich gerade für einen bestimmten Supermarkt entscheiden. Das kann entweder mithilfe einer offenen Frage herausgefunden werden, oder mithilfe einer Frage mit Mehrfachantworten. Verbraucher in Form von offenen Fragen zu befragen, hat den Vorteil, dass Informationen aufgedeckt werden, an die man sonst nicht gekommen wäre.
Another method is to track your competitors’ links. Content marketing is often done in unison with link building. Your competitors most likely create content on blogging sites. Within the articles they submit, there are external backlinks that point back to their own websites. Those links can be followed like a trail of breadcrumbs to track what they’ve been up to. Moz and Majestic are tools that are great for doing this. Here’s a look at what Moz found when I looked up Easel.ly, an infographics company.

Before we can create our campaign we must clearly understand our target audience. This will help develop the campaign structure and inform the way you create the campaign. The key to successful advertising is truly understanding the wants and needs of your customers. To understand our audience we can ask Who? What? Where? When? Why? This chapter discusses how to understand your audience and build a campaign around their wants and needs. <<<<
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